LandslidesENGSTROM, HAQUE, KEELINGS – Fatal landslides in Europe

Ubydul Haque, Philipp Blum, Paula F. da Silva, Peter Andersen, Jürgen Pilz, Sergey R. Chalov, Jean-Philippe Malet, Mateja Jemec Auflic, Norina Andres, Eleftheria Poyiadji, Pedro C. Lamas, Wenyi Zhang, Igor Peshevski, Halldór G. Pétursson, Tayfun Kurt, Nikolai Dobrev, Juan Carlos García-Davalillo, Matina Halkia, Stefano Ferri, George Gaprindashvili, Johanna Engström, David Keellings

Article first published online: 07 MAY 2016 Landslides

DOI: 10.1007/s10346-016-0689-3

ABSTRACT:

Landslides are a major hazard causing human and large economic losses worldwide. However, the quantification of fatalities and casualties is highly underestimated and incomplete, thus, the estimation of landslide risk is rather ambitious. Hence, a spatio-temporal distribution of deadly landslides is presented for 27 European countries over the last 20  years (1995–2014). Catastrophic landslides are widely distributed throughout Europe, however, with a great concentration in mountainous areas. In the studied period, a total of 1370 deaths and 784 injuries were reported resulting from 476 landslides. Turkey showed the highest fatalities with 335. An increasing trend of fatal landslides is observed, with a pronounced number of fatalities in the latest period from 2008 to 2014. The latter are mostly triggered by natural extreme events such as storms (i.e., heavy rainfall), earthquakes, and floods and only minor by human activities, such as mining and excavation works. Average economic loss per year in Europe is approximately 4.7 billion Euros. This study serves as baseline information for further risk mapping by integrating deadly landslide locations, local land use data, and will therefore help countries to protect human lives and property.

Read the full publication at Landslides

Women in Geography 2015 Back (left to right): Johanna Engstrom, Corene Matyas, Rhonda Black, Guoqian Yan, Dawn Nekorchuk, Caroline Parks, Di Yang, Sadie Ryan, Jane Southworth, Audrey Smith Middle (left to right): Hannah Herrero, Jaclyn Hall, Maira Castro, Aghane Antunes, Cynthia Simmons, Alexandra Sabo, Barbara McDade-Gordon, Chiung-Shiuan Fu, ???, Joann Mossa Front (left to right): Yao Zhou, Stephanie Zick, Carly Muir
Women in Geography 2015
Back (left to right): Johanna Engstrom, Corene Matyas, Rhonda Black, Guoqian Yan, Dawn Nekorchuk, Caroline Parks, Di Yang, Sadie Ryan, Jane Southworth, Audrey Smith
Middle (left to right): Hannah Herrero, Jaclyn Hall, Maira Castro, Aghane Antunes, Cynthia Simmons, Alexandra Sabo, Barbara McDade-Gordon, Chiung-Shiuan Fu, Roberta Carvalho, Joann Mossa
Front (left to right): Yao Zhou, Stephanie Zick, Carly Muir
Photo courtesy Ms. Johanna Engstrom
Photo courtesy Ms. Johanna Engstrom

Geography PhD candidate Johanna Engstrom recently published her master’s thesis Effect of Northern Hemisphere Teleconnections on the Hydropower Production in Southern Sweden, which explores the climate drivers of hydropower production in southern Sweden, in the Journal of Water Resource Planning and Management. In addition to increasing our understanding of what large scale atmospheric drivers affect this region, the findings were welcomed by E.ON GmbH, one of the world’s largest energy production companies. E.ON’s renewable energies forecasting team have incorporated Engstrom’s findings into their hydropower production forecasts for Scandinavia.

“I was so happy to hear that my results are beneficial,” said Engstrom. “I’m really passionate about renewable energies and want my research to benefit its development and make it more reliable. For my PhD I have changed my geographical area to the southeast U.S., a region with numerous hydropower plants and significant potential for further development. I hope my research can expand our knowledge of the hydroclimatology of the southeast. This would help water managers and decision makers to make more informed decisions, and could help boost hydropower production!”

Engstrom is in her third year pursuing a PhD in Geography, under the supervision of College of Liberal Arts and Science Associate Dean Dr. Peter Waylen. Her research interests include physical geography, climatology, and renewable energy.

ENGSTROM – Effect of Northern Hemisphere Teleconnections on the Hydropower Production in Southern Sweden

Johanna Engström and Cintia Bertacchi Uvo

Article first published online: 07 Oct 2015 Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management

DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)WR.1943-5452.0000595 , 05015008.

ABSTRACT: Approximately 50% of Sweden’s electricity is produced by hydropower. This makes energy production in the country vulnerable to factors affecting water availability. Research has shown a positive correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and hydropower production in Norway and northern Sweden during winter months. The correlation is, however, weaker in southern Sweden, which indicates that there might be other low-frequency atmospheric drivers (teleconnections) affecting this area. The aim of this paper is to analyze the natural climate forcing that affects hydropower production in southern Sweden on a seasonal basis. This knowledge may be of key importance in improving long-term (seasonal to yearly) water management and planning for electricity production in southern Sweden. The Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated between the principal component time series of electricity production (1999–2010) from 17 hydropower stations in 5 different rivers located in southern Sweden and 5 different teleconnection indices: the NAO, East Atlantic (EA), East Atlantic/Western Russia (EA/WR), Scandinavia (SCA), and Polar/Eurasia (POL). Results show that the impact of teleconnections on hydropower electricity production varies with season. In winter, the NAO shows the strongest positive relation with hydropower electricity production, explaining 24% of the variability in production, while the SCA has an almost as strong (15%) opposite effect. During spring and summer, the EA/WR alone shows a significant negative relation, explaining respectively 9 and 13% of the variance in production. No significant correlation appeared during the fall season.

Read the full publication at Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management