The UF Geography Department is sending a large contingent to New Orleans for the 2018 meeting of the American Association of Geographers

Find out where you can see a GeoGator present their research below:

Anthropogenic change to fluvial systems, I
Geomorphology Specialty Group, Paleoenvironmental Change Specialty Group, Water Resources Specialty Group
4/10/2018
8:20 AM
Balcony K, Marriott, 4th Floor
Anthropogenic Disturbances and Sand Bar Size Variations of Coastal Plain Rivers, USA
Joann Mossa

*****************************************************************

Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (I)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/10/2018
9:00 AM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
Using a Network Analysis Framework to Discuss Delivery of Mosquito Abatement Services in Machala, Ecuador
Catherine A Lippi, Liang Mao, Sadie J Ryan

*****************************************************************

Anthropogenic change to fluvial systems, II
Geomorphology Specialty Group, Paleoenvironmental Change Specialty Group, Water Resources Specialty Group
4/10/2018
11:20 AM
Room: Balcony K, Marriott, 4th Floor
Riffle-Pool Variability in the Confined Lowermost Mississippi River
Chia-Yu Wu, Joann Mossa

*****************************************************************

Applications of Time Series Remote Sensing at the Global to Landscape Scale
4/10/2018
12:40 PM
Grand Chenier, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Examining vegetation changes in Eastern Zambia savanna landscapes from 1984-2016: an integrated approach
Hannah Herrero, Jane Southworth

*****************************************************************

Applications of Time Series Remote Sensing at the Global to Landscape Scale
4/10/2018
1:20 PM
Grand Chenier, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Latitudes and land use: global biome shifts in greenness persistence across three decades
Jane Southworth, Sadie J Ryan, Reza Khatami, Peter Waylen, Hannah V Herrero

*****************************************************************

Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (III)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/10/2018
1:40 PM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
The future is uncertain: global shifts in potential distribution and seasonal risk of Aedes-transmitted viruses
Sadie Jane Ryan

*****************************************************************

Experiential Learning in Geography Education II
Geography Education Specialty Group
4/10/2018
3:40 PM
Napoleon A1, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Recruitment and retention in Geosciences through integrated professional and academic experiences
Heidi J. L. Lannon, Corene Matyas

*****************************************************************

Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (IV)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group
4/10/2018
4:00 PM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
Precise space-time interventions on intra-urban dengue outbreaks using large-scale mobile phone tracking data
Liang Mao

*****************************************************************

Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (V)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/10/2018
5:20 PM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
A GIS-based Machine Learning Technique for Predicting Spatial Distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae), the Main Vectors of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis
Abolfazl Mollalo

*****************************************************************

Land Change Science
Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Remote Sensing Specialty Group
4/11/2018
8:20 AM
Maurepas, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Operational large-area land-cover mapping: Ethiopia case study
Reza Khatami, Jane Southworth, Carly Muir

*****************************************************************

Topics in U.S. Regional Geography
Rural Geography Specialty Group
4/11/2018
10:00 AM
Galvez, Marriott, 5th Floor
Changing Economic Geography of Southern New England’s “Tobacco Valley”: Surviving in the 21st Century
Matthew McKay

*****************************************************************

High-Level Perspectives: NSF, Geosciences, Big Ideas, and Geography
4/11/2018
11:50 AM – 1:10 PM
Bayside C, Sheraton, 4th Floor
This session will feature comments from William Easterling, who currently serves as the Assistant Director for Geosciences at the National Science Foundation. On assignment from positions as a professor and dean at Pennsylvania State University, Easterling is the first geographer to serve in the second-highest level of officials at NSF. His comments will touch on issues related to NSF that geographers will find of interest, including federal support for basic research; major emphases for NSF, the NSF Big Ideas, and opportunities for geographers in the Directorate for Geosciences. Other geographers currently at NSF will serve as discussants and provide complementary perspectives from their divisions in the Biological Sciences and Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences directorates. Overall, this special session is designed to provide attendees with new perspectives regarding trends, opportunities, and issues at NSF.
Michael Binford

*****************************************************************

Environmental Geography
4/11/2018
1:40 PM
Balcony N, Marriott, 4th Floor
Morphometric differences between megafans and alluvial fans
M. Anwar Sounny-Slitine

*****************************************************************

Spatial Demography
Population Specialty Group
4/11/2018
6:40 PM
Studio 4, Marriott, 2nd Floor
Spatially explicit age segregation index and self-rated health of older adults in U.S. cities
Guangran Deng, Liang Mao

*****************************************************************

Hurricanes I: Climatology/meteorology
4/12/2018
9:00 AM
Napoleon D1, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Spatial characteristics of rain fields associated with tropical cyclones landfalling over the western Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea
Yao Zhou, Corene Matyas

*****************************************************************

Geographies of health and health care V: Spatial and temporal analysis
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group
4/12/2018
1:20 PM
Estherwood, Sheraton, 4th Floor
Understanding temporal changes of access to healthcare: an analytic framework for local factor impacts
Jue Yang, Liang Mao

*****************************************************************

Regional evolutionary economic geography approaches to destination evolution
Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Specialty Group
4/12/2018
1:20 PM – 3:00 PM
Mid-City, Sheraton, 8th Floor
A Comparative Assessment of Tourism Development of Zambian National Parks to those in the South African Region
Brian Child

*****************************************************************

Physical Geography Poster Session II
4/12/2018
1:20 PM – 3:00 PM
Napoleon Foyer/Common St. Corridor, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Accessibility to hurricane shelters for Airbnb users in Miami metropolitan area
Sanghoon Kim

*****************************************************************

Development, Geospatial Technologies and Spatial Organization in Africa
Africa Specialty Group
4/12/2018
4:00 PM
Gallier A, Sheraton, 4th Floor
Vegetation Persistence and Change in Ethiopia as a Function of Climate
Carly Muir, Jane Southworth, Reza Khatami

*****************************************************************

Preparing Competitive Research Grants in Biogeography
Biogeography Specialty Group, Careers and Professional Development
4/12/2018
5:20 PM – 7:00 PM
Studio 1, Marriott, 2nd Floor
This panel, organized by and for biogeographers but open to all, aims to review and discuss the ins and outs of preparing competitive research grants. Discussion topics will range from where, how, and why to successfully seek external funding for biogeographic research, NSF broader impacts and intellectual merit, lesser-known sources of funding, what to do when the big plans fall through, and much more. The panel features panelists from various career stages and areas of expertise.
Michael Binford

*****************************************************************

Geographies of Climate Change Mitigation: Marketization, Financialization, and Decarbonization 1
Economic Geography Specialty Group, Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
4/13/2018
8:40 AM
Grand Ballroom D, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Tropical Africa and the Political Economy of Climate Change Mitigation
Abe Goldman

*****************************************************************

Landscape Speciality Group-Student Presentation Competition II
Landscape Specialty Group
4/13/2018
10:40 AM
Estherwood, Sheraton, 4th Floor
A landscape level analysis of urbanization, lake level change and community impacts in Mwanza Gulf, Tanzania
Ryan Good, Jane Southworth

*****************************************************************

Wetlands and Meadows: Integrated Research in Geomorphology, Soils, Hydrology, Biogeography and Microclimatology
Biogeography Specialty Group, Climate Specialty Group, Geomorphology Specialty Group
4/13/2018
3:40 PM
Astor Ballroom I, Astor, 2nd Floor
Predicting the Potential Geographic Distributions of Non-Native Fishes in Florida with Climate Change
Joseph A. Andreoli

*****************************************************************

Tropical Conservation, Development & Agriculture Short Papers
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group, Graduate Student Affinity Group
4/13/2018
5:53 PM
Rampart, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Climate, Food Insecurity and Under-five Stunting in Zambia
Audrey Smith

*****************************************************************

Tropical Conservation, Development & Agriculture Short Papers
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group, Graduate Student Affinity Group
4/13/2018
5:53 PM
Rampart, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Situational Analysis of Mangalane, Mozambique in the context of a Community Based Natural Resource Management Project
Leandra Merz

*****************************************************************

Health (Workforce) Geography
Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group
4/14/2018
8:00 AM
Oak Alley, Sheraton, 4th Floor
Mapping rural–urban disparities in late-stage cancer with space-time rurality index and GWR
Liang Mao, Jue Yang, Guangran Deng

*****************************************************************

Analyzing movement data using GIS: Lagrangian and Eulerian perspectives
Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/14/2018
4:00 PM – 5:40 PM
Napoleon B2, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Living la Vida T-LoCoH: Site fidelity amongst Florida wild and captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during the epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) transmission period
Emily Dinh, Jeremy P. Orange, Jason K. Blackburn

*****************************************************************

Analyzing space and time in the African environments
4/14/2018
5:20 PM
Grand Ballroom D, Astor, 2nd Floor
Time Series Analysis of Vegetation Change and Changes in Persistence Analyses in Umfolozi-Hluhluwe Park 2001-2016
Meshari Alenezi

*****************************************************************

Health and Hazards
Type: Paper
4/13/2018
6:00 PM
Napoleon B2, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Effects of Brucellosis Serological Status on Physiological Conditions and Behavioral Mechanisms of Southwestern Montana Elk
Anni Yang, Jason Blackburn

*****************************************************************

Health and Hazards
Type: Paper
4/13/2018
6:40 PM
Napoleon B2, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Inferring processes from dynamic abundance time series
Jason Blackburn

The University of Florida is looking for a new faculty member in the area of ‘Health and Social Change in Africa’. This preeminence position is for exceptional candidates at the Assistant level, or Associate or Full Professors. This position would be in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) which is home to many departments, including Geography, and will also link directly to the Center for African Studies.

A geographer would be an excellent fit given the topics of interest, which include, but are not limited to: health policy and institutions, demography, migration, environmental change, war and conflict, political and/or cultural change, economic development, political economy of health and healthcare, globalization, or other major aspects of social change and transition in Africa. If joining Geography, the faculty would join an exciting and engaged group of scholars already working in Africa (Drs. Brian Child, Jane Southworth, Peter Waylen, Sadie Ryan, Barbara McDade-Gordon, Michael Binford, Abe Goldman, Jason Blackburn and Greg Glass) and in Health and Disease (Drs. Sadie Ryan, Greg Glass, Jason Blackburn and Liang Mao).
Applications commence review on January 11th and if you wish to find the full job advertisement and to apply please see below:
http://explore.jobs.ufl.edu/cw/en-us/job/495251/preeminence-associatefull-professor-in-public-health-social-change-in-africa

BINFORD – Land-cover change within and around protected areas in a biodiversity hotspot

Karen M. Bailey*, Robert A. McCleeryb, Michael W. Binfordc & Christa Zweigd

Article first published onine: 24 Sep 2015 in Land Use Science

DOI:10.1080/1747423X.2015.1086905

ABSTRACT: The landscape surrounding protected areas influences their ability to maintain ecosystem functions and achieve conservation goals. As anthropogenic intensification continues, it is important to monitor land-use and land-cover change in and around protected areas. We measure land-cover change surrounding protected areas in the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Biodiversity hotspot from the 1980s to present. Using Landsat imagery, we classified land cover within and around each protected area. Agricultural land uses were increasing and often directly border protected area boundaries. Human settlements increased around every protected area, potentially increasing human activity along the edges of protected areas and threatening their ecological integrity. Urban expansion around protected areas varied but increased as much as 10%. Woody vegetation cover varied both within and around protected areas with possible evidence of deforestation and shrub encroachment throughout the hotspot. We recommend monitoring land cover across southeastern Africa to better understand regional trends in land-use impacts to protected areas.

Read the full publication at Land Use Science

 

HALL, BINFORD –

Forests are experiencing simultaneous changes in climate, disturbance regimes, and management, all
of which affect ecosystem function. Climate change is shifting ranges and altering forest productivity.

 

JUSTIN M. BECKNELL, ANKUR R. DESAI, MICHAEL C. DIETZE, COURTNEY A. SCHULTZ, GREGORY STARR, PAUL A. DUFFY, JERRY F. FRANKLIN, AFSHIN POURMOKHTARIAN, JACLYN HALL, PAUL C. STOY, MICHAEL W. BINFORD, LINDSAY R. BORING, AND CHRISTINA L. STAUDHAMMER

BioScience 65: 263–274. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail:
journals.permissions@oup.com. doi:10.1093/biosci/biu234

Forests are experiencing simultaneous changes in climate, disturbance regimes, and management, all
of which affect ecosystem function. Climate change is shifting ranges and altering forest productivity. Disturbance regimes are changing with the potential for novel interactions among disturbance types. In some areas, forest management practices are intensifying, whereas in other areas, lower-impact ecological methods are being used. Interactions among these changing factors are likely to alter ecosystem structure and function at regional to continental scales. A macrosystems approach is essential to assessing the broadscale impacts of these changes and quantify cross-scale interactions, emergent patterns, and feedbacks. A promising line of analysis is the assimilation of data with ecosystem models to scale processes to the macrosystem and generate projections based on alternative scenarios. Analyses of these
projections can characterize the range of future variability in forest function and provide
information to guide policy, industry, and science in a changing world.

READ FULL ARTICLE:

Becknell_et_al_2015_Macrosystems_forest_management_BioScience-2015 (3)

 

 

Dr. Michael W. Binford

Professor

mbinford@ufl.edu

(352) 294-7500

Personal website

Curriculum Vitae

Focus Areas

Areas of Specialization

  • Macrosystems Biogeography
  • Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing Applications in Environmental Systems
  • Land-Water Interactions
  • Landscape Dynamics, especially Land-Cover/Land-Use Change
  • Paleoecology, Paleolimnology and Paleoclimatology

Educational Background

  • PhD in Zoology and Geology, Indiana University, 1980
  • M.S. in Fisheries Biology, Louisiana State University, 1975
  • B.S. in  Biology, Kansas State University, 1973

Recent Courses

  • GEO 4037/5134C  Remote Sensing
  • GEO 4300/5305     Environmental Biogeography
  • GEO 2200               Physical Geography
  • GEO 4120               Aerial Photo Interpretation
  • GEO 5159               G.I.S. Applications in Environmental systems

Current Graduate Students

Masters

Recent Graduate Students

PhD

In My Own Words

I am a physical geographer, biogeographer, and landscape ecologist specializing in the study of environmental systems, or human-environment interactions. I have published papers on the effects of climate variability on cultural rise and collapse, agroecosystem bases for sustainable agriculture, environmental systems as a basis for landscape planning and ecological restoration, and technical aspects of measuring lake sedimentation rates. The research requires geospatial science approaches, and uses Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing techniques extensively. The work also involves collaboration with anthropologists, archaeologists, ecosystem modelers, geologists, economists, and planners. Recent NSF and NASA-funded research examines how people live around protected areas in East and Southern Africa, and how land ownership influences carbon uptake and storage in the southeastern U.S. coastal plain.

Recent Publications

Cassidy, L.1, J. Southworth, C. Gibbes, and M.W. Binford. In press. Beyond classifications: combining continuous and discrete approaches to land cover change analyses within the Lower Mekong River Region. International Journal of Remote Sensing. Revised, to be published May 2013, Vol. 39:26-45.

Staub, C.G., Binford, M.W. & Stevens, F.R., 2013. Elephant herbivory in Majete Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. African Journal of Ecology, DOI:10.1111/aje.12064.

Gaughan, A.E. F.R. Stevens, C. Gibbes, J. Southworth & M.W. Binford, 2012. Linking vegetation response to seasonal precipitation in the Okavango–Kwando–Zambezi catchment of southern Africa. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 33(21), pp.6783–6804.

Pricope, N.G. and M.W. Binford. 2012. A spatio-temporal analysis of fire recurrence and extent for semi-arid savanna ecosystems in Southern Africa using moderate resolution satellite imagery. Journal of Environmental Management. 100:72-85

Van Holt, Tracy, C. Moreno, M. Binford, K. Portier, S. Mulsow, and T. Frazer. 2012. The influence of landscape change on a nearshore fishery in southern Chile. Global Change Biology. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2012.02674.x

Urdaz-Rodríguez, J., G. Fosgate, A.R. Alleman, O. Rae, A. Donovan. M.W. Binford, A. Zaragoza, P. Melendez. 2012. Association between ecological factors and the presence of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus larvae in Puerto Rico. Exp. Appl. Acarol. DOI 10.1007/s10493-012-9573-6. Published online 26 May 2012.

Patarasuk, R. & Binford, M.W., 2012. Longitudinal analysis of the road network development and land-cover change in Lop Buri province, Thailand, 1989–2006. Applied Geography, 32(2), pp.228-239.

Cassidy, L., M.W. Binford, J. Southworth, and G.Barnes. 2010. Social and ecological factors and land-use land-cover diversity in two provinces in southeast Asia. Journal of Land Use Science. 5:277-306. Online version doi:10.1080/1747423X.2010.500688. http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/1747423X.2010.500688.

Southworth, J., J. Hartter, M. W Binford, A. Goldman, C. A Chapman, L. J Chapman, P. Omeja, and E. Binford. 2010. Parks, people and pixels: evaluating landscape effects of an East African national park on its surroundings. Tropical Conservation Science 3, no. 2: 122–142.

Gaughan, A.E., Binford, M.W. & Southworth, J., 2009. Tourism, forest conversion, and land transformations in the Angkor basin, Cambodia. Applied Geography, 29(2), pp.212–223.
Rivero, R. et al., 2009. Integrating spectral indices into prediction models of soil phosphorus in a subtropical wetland. Remote Sensing of Environment, 113(11), pp.2389–2402.

Rivero, R.G. et al., 2007. Spectral Inferential Modeling of Soil Phosphorus Using Hybrid Geostatistical Methods.

Prabha, T.V., Karipot, A. & Binford, M.W., 2007. Characteristics of secondary circulations over an inhomogeneous surface simulated with large-eddy simulation. Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 123(2), pp.239–261.
Southworth, J., G.S. Cumming, M. Marsik, and M.W. Binford. 2006. Linking Spatial and Temporal Variation at Multiple Scales in a Heterogeneous Landscape. Professional Geographer 58:406-420.
Weng, C., M.B. Bush, J.H. Curtis, A.L. Kolata, T.D. Dillehay, M.W. Binford. 2006. Deglaciation and Holocene climate change in the western Peruvian Andes. Quaternary Research. 66:87-96.
Shearer, A.W., D.A. Mouat, S.D. Bassett, M.W. Binford, C.W. Johnson, and J.A. Saarinen. 2006. Examining development-related uncertainties for environmental management: Strategic planning scenarios in southern California. Landscape and Urban Planning 77:359-381.
Binford, M.W. and R. Karty. 2006. Riparian greenways and water resources. Ch. 4 in D.A. Smith (ed.). Ecology of Greenways. 2nd Ed. Island Press. Washington, D.C.
Binford, M.W., H.L. Gholz, G. Starr, and T.A. Martin. 2006. Regional carbon dynamics of the Southeastern Coastal Plain: balancing ecosystem type, timber harvesting, environmental variation, and fire. J. Geophys. Res. 111, D24S92, doi:10.1029/2005JD006820.
Loescher, H.W., Starr G., Martin, T.A., Binford, M., Gholz, H.L. 2006.The effect of local atmospheric circulations on daytime carbon dioxide flux measurements over a Pinus elliottii canopy. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 45: 1127-1140.
Cumming, G.S., G. Barnes, S. Perz, M. SAchmink, J. Southworth, M.Bimford, R.D. Holt, C. Stickler and T. Van Holt, 2005. An Exploratory Framework for the Empirical Measurement of Resilience. Ecosystems 8(8): 975 – 987.
Binford, M. W., T. J. Lee, and R. M. Townsend. 2004. Sampling Design for an Integrated Socio-Economic and Ecologic Survey Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Ordination. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 101: 11517-11522.
Rocha, K. S., M. W. Binford, and M. Schmink. 2004. Mapeando Uso e Cobertura do Solo em Projeto de Assentamento Utilizando Técnicas de Sensoriamento Remoto e Métodos Participativos. Uáquiri: A Geografia e a Amazônia em Questão 2: 107-118.

 

Jensen, R. R., and M. W. Binford. 2004. Measurement and Comparison of Leaf Area Index Estimators Derived from Satellite Remote Sensing Techniques. International Journal of Remote Sensing 25 (20): 4251-4265.

Tugend, K. I., M. S. Allen, and M. W. Binford. 2004. Potential Use of Remote Sensing to Assess Effects of Wave Action on Plant Re-Establishment. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management 42: 54-60.

Book Chapters

Hartter, J., J. Southworth, M.W. Binford. 2009. Parks as a Mechanism to Maintain and Facilitate Recovery of Forest Cover: Examining Reforestation, Forest Maintenance and Productivity in Uganda. Ch. 12 (pp 275 – 296) in Nagrenda, H., and J. Southworth. Reforested landscapes. Springer Landscape Series.

Felkner, J. S., and M. W. Binford. 2002. Modeling a Soil Moisture Index Using Geographic Information System in a Developing Country Context. In Handbook of Water Sensitive Planning and Design, ed. R. France, 513-538. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

Hill, K., and M. W. Binford. 2002. The Role of Category Definition in Habitat Models:  Practical and Logical Limitations of Using Boolean, Indexed, Probabilistic and Fuzzy Categories. In Predicting Species Occurrences: Issues of Scale and Accuracy, ed. J. M. Scott, P. J. Heglund, F. Samson, J. Haufler, M. Morrison, M. Raphael, and B. Wall, 97-106. Washington: Island Press.

Book Reviews

Binford, M.W., 2008. Useless Arithmetic: Why Environmental Scientists Can’t Predict the Future (review). Southeastern Geographer, 48(2), pp.255-258.

–top–