Image courtesy Dr. Joann MossaImpacts, Recovery, and Ongoing Stressors in the Apalachicola River, Florida

Speaker: Dr. Joann Mossa

Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, January 23, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

The Apalachicola River has experienced impacts because of dredging for navigation and hydrologic droughts exacerbated by upstream water consumption. We review these impacts and discuss how the river is recovering following the end of dredging and the application of floodplain inundation models. Sand bars are stabilizing with vegetation since dredging ended, but ongoing impacts include erosion of dredge spoil mounds altering the adjacent channel and reduced water inputs affecting the floodplain and bay.

Image courtesy Dr. Sadie Ryan

Speaker: Dr. Sadie Ryan

Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, January 16, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Forecasting the impacts of climate change on vector-borne diseases (VBDs)—especially those under current public scrutiny and concern, such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika—is a key component of global public health preparedness, and a key component of the ongoing issue of climate change preparedness. In this talk, I will showcase a strategy for applying ecophysiological models of temperature-dependent transmission to current and future climate models at large scales. I will demonstrate how our collaborative team have used these models to explore future scenarios for malaria, and for Aedes spp transmitted diseases, and how we can use mapping approaches as useful visualization tools, and how we tackle describing the multiple potential outcomes. I will also describe some local-scale, city and province level approaches to understanding vectorborne disease dynamics and management, and explore issues of how these two scales come together (or don’t) for decision making on the ground and in the boardroom.

Bio: Sadie J. Ryan is an Associate Professor of Medical Geography in the Department of Geography and in the Emerging Pathogens Institute (EPI) at the University of Florida, and PI of the Quantitative Disease Ecology and Conservation (QDEC) Lab group (www.sadieryan.net).

Ryan’s training is in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (BA, Princeton), with an emphasis on conservation biology, quantitative ecology, and particularly, disease ecology. Ryan’s PhD work (UC Berkeley) centered on African buffalo spatial ecology in their savanna environment, in the context of an epidemic of Bovine Tuberculosis. Ryan’s postdoctoral work in Anthropological Science (Stanford, McGill), Ecology (NCEAS) and Geography (UCSB), launched her interdisciplinary work looking at the anthropogenic impacts of land use change, climate change, and conservation management goals in African parks landscapes, and the role of socioecological systems in disease transmission in Africa and Latin America.

This research continues today, investigating the multiscale issues of climate-health relationships in and on landscapes, and interactions with livelihoods, sustainability, parks management goals, the urban environment, and local perceptions. QDEC Lab is home to multiple projects in ecology at the human interface, spanning socioecological systems of vector borne and environmental disease ecology, climate-health modeling, insecticide resistance, and wildlife conservation, from Florida to the Old and New World tropics.

 

Conserving Imperiled Mammal Species in Florida Across a Changing Landscape

Speaker: Terry J. Doonan

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Thursday, December 5, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Although many people know about the large, charismatic, endangered mammal species in Florida, few people are familiar with other listed mammals here. To conserve these species, we are developing solutions to address the challenges they face as conditions change across Florida’s landscape.

Avoiding Amazonian Catastrophes – Prospects for Conservation in the 21st Century

Speaker: Dr. Robert Walker

Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, March 14, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

New infrastructure threats confront the Amazon. Resulting development could push its forest past a “tipping point,” replacing it with tropical savanna. This would degrade biodiversity, reduce carbon storage, and harm continental agriculture. Environmental policy in Brazil has weakened over time. Luckily, indigenous peoples are capable of resisting development forces.

Image courtesy Ms. Roberta Mendonça De Carvalho

Amazons Within The Amazon – A Multiscale Assessment of Urbanization

Speaker: Dr. Roberta Mendonça De Carvalho

PhD Alumna, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, November 14, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Urbanization in the Brazilian Amazon has reached 80%. This is a recent and rather intensive process. At the same we see population increase, we see the fortification of the hydropower system. But how and where this urbanization is reshaping the profile of the rainforest? And what is the role of hydropower in stimulating urbanization?

Image courtesy Dr. Robert McCleery

Maintaining Diverse Wildlife in Africa’s Rapidly Changing Savannas

Speaker: Dr. Robert McCleery 

Associate Professor, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation , University of Florida

Thursday, November 7, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

With a full complement of large herbivores and predators the wildlife of Africa savannas are unique but face an increasingly trouble suite of challenges. In this talk, we will explore some of the challenges and opportunity to maintaining wildlife on the rapidly developing continent.

Technology-Based Interventions to Promote Physical Activity and Healthy Eating

Speaker: Dr. Danielle Jake-Schoffman

Assistant Professor, Department of Health Education and Behavior,, University of Florida

Thursday, October 16, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Modifiable lifestyle behaviors have immense power to prevent and treat chronic disease. Yet, the majority of people in the US are insufficiently physically active and not consuming adequate fruits and vegetables.

This talk will explore the ways in which mobile technology can help engage people in behavior change interventions and expand the reach of evidence-based programs for physical activity and healthy eating.

Image courtesy Dr. Bo Yang

Drone Mapping for Coastal Seagrass Monitoring and Citizen Science

Speaker: Dr. Bo Yang

Citizen Science GIS, University of Central Florida

Thursday, October 10, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

High quality multi-spectral observations with fine spatial resolution and frequent temporal coverage are indispensable in seagrass monitoring and analyses. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), equipped with a multispectral sensor, affords an opportunity to improve upon satellite imagery for coastal management because of the very high spatial resolution, multispectral capability, and opportunity to collect real-time observations.

This talk will present results of our NSF seagrass drone mapping project. We performed multispectral UAV mapping fieldworks along the west coast of US. The UAV multi-spectral mapping method provided advanced information of the physical, an improved land feature delineation, and a significantly better mapping product than satellite imagery with coarser resolution (figure below). We also incorporated drone training and community outreach into the project with citizen science.

Image courtesy Dr. Kim Valenta

The Mad Dog Initiative – Identifying and Mitigating Invasive Species Threats in Madagascar

Speaker: Dr. Kim Valenta

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida

Thursday, October 3, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Since 2013, The Mad Dog Initiative has worked to humanely reduce cat and dog presence in and around Madagascar’s protected areas, while also monitoring endemic biodiversity in the world’s hottest hot spot. This is the story of the mishaps, wins and losses of addressing a slippery problem in a far away place.