Global map of ForestGEO plots. Image courtesy Dr. Daniel Johnson

Speaker: Dr. Daniel J. Johnson

Assistant Professor, School of Forest Resources and Conservations, University of Florida

Thursday, October 1, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Zoom, livestreamed on YouTube

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

I will explore the origins, outcomes, and future for the ForestGEO plot network. If ForestGEO was a researcher then it would have an h-Index of 259 and over 265,000 citations according to Google Scholar. The ForestGEO network is managed by the Smithsonian Institution but inclusion in the network is based on investigators following the pre-defined methodology. I will speak on some of the major themes and discoveries that have emerged from this rather unique methodology and bottom-up research network. I will also introduce the newest plot in the network that is located at the UF managed Ordway-Swisher Biological Station. Finally, I will discuss what I see as exciting future directions of this network.

Dr. Johnson is Assistant Professor of Silviculture in the UF School of Forest Resources and Conservation. His B.S. was in Forestry from Purdue University and both M.S. and Ph.D. from Indiana University in Environmental Science and Biology, respectively. His research is about how forests function and respond to natural and anthropogenic change.


Speaker: Dr. Mike Binford

Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, September 24, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Zoom, livestreamed on YouTube

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

This three-part colloquium will describe what it is like to work at the U.S. National Science Foundation as a Program Director, the program that Dr. Binford directed (a convergence of Geography and Biology), and a Macrosystems Biology project that is mapping forest management practices at the continental scale as the first step of incorporating forest management into Earth Systems Models.

Dr. Binford is Professor of Geography at UF. He has a BS in Biology from Kansas State University, an MS in Fisheries from Louisiana State University and a PhD in Biology from Indiana University. His research interests can be called Macrosystems Biogeography because nobody knows what that means.

Image courtesy Dr. Anita Marshall
Image courtesy Dr. Anita Marshall

Speaker: Dr. Anita Marshall (she/her)

Lecturer, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida

Thursday, September 17, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Zoom, livestreamed on YouTube

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

In the geosciences, field work is valued for learning opportunities and scientific research, as well as personal and professional growth for students. But exclusion of students with disabilities from these formative learning experiences can negatively influence degree persistence and career prospects in the geosciences. Based on an evaluation of disability-inclusive field courses and personal experiences undertaking field research with a physical disability, this presentation will outline tips and best practices for building inclusive learning communities in any setting; be it classroom, lab, field, or virtual.

Dr. Anita Marshall is a Lecturer and researcher at the University of Florida, Gainesville. She has a BS in Earth Science and MS in Geology from the University of Arkansas and a PhD in Geology from the University of South Florida. Her primary research area is Geoscience Education, where she studies academic and social engagement in geoscience field courses and works to improve accessibility and inclusion for people with disabilities. Her secondary research area is volcanology where she utilizes near-surface geophysics to study surface deposits of volcanoes in northern Arizona. Dr. Marshall is also the Director of Operations for the non-profit International Association for Geoscience Diversity (the IAGD), where she serves as a mentor and advocate for geoscience students, faculty and professionals with disabilities.

 

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Dr. Marshall’s  publications:

Marshall, A. & Thatcher, S. (2019). Creating Spaces for Geoscientists with Disabilities to Thrive. Eos, 100, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019EO136434.

Atchison, C. L., Marshall, A.M, & and Collins, T. (2019). A multiple case study of inclusive learning communities enabling active participation in geoscience field courses for students with physical disabilities. Journal of Geoscience Ed. DOI: 10.1080/10899995.2019.1600962. Marshall, A. M. (2018).

Evaluation of academic and social engagement in a technology-based collaborative approach to inclusive geoscience field learning. University of Florida. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7193

Carabajal, I.G., Marshall, A.M., & Atchison, C.L. (2017). A synthesis of access and inclusion in geoscience education literature. Journal of Geoscience Education, 65, 531-541. DOI: 10.5408/16-211.1.

And other helpful publications: Whitmeyer, S. J., Atchison, C.L., and Collins, T. (2020) “Using Mobile Technologies to Enhance Accessibility and Inclusion in Field-Based Learning.” GSA Today 30 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1130/GSATG462A.1

Feig, A., Atchison, C.L., Stokes, A., & Gilley, B. (2019). Achieving inclusive field-based education: Results and recommendations from an accessible geoscience field trip. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 19(2), 66-87. DOI: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5163-751X

Fink, J. E., and Hummel, M. L. (2015). With educational benefits for all: Campus inclusion through learning communities designed for underserved student populations. New Directions for Student Services. https://doi.org/10.1002/ss.20115

Stokes, A., and Boyle, A.P. (2009). “The undergraduate geoscience fieldwork experience: Influencing factors and implications for learning.” Field geology education: Historical perspectives and modern approaches 461 (2009): 291.

Video: Here’s a link to the full video where the short clip I showed in the presentation came from: The IAGD in Ireland: Exploring Approaches to Inclusive Field Geology https://youtu.be/7O_1GYx4DUY

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Speaker: Aline Carrara

PhD Student, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, September 10, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Zoom, livestreamed on YouTube

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

This dissertation addresses the creation and destruction of indigenous territories (ITs) in the Brazilian Amazônia by studying the formation, expansion, and maintenance of ITs, processes referred to collectively as territorialization; and their dissolution and destruction, referred to as deterritorialization.  The proposed research is motivated by current efforts, on part of the Brazilian State and economic interests, to deterritorialize ITs, an outcome that leads to the weakening of indigenous rights and outright exploitation. Territory in the Brazilian Amazonas an artifact of contention and emerges on the basis of a confrontation of forces manifesting across multiple spatial scales in attempts of territorialization.

I present an assessment of the impact of deterritorializing forces such as infrastructure development, large-scale agriculture and cattle ranching, mining activities on ITs, resulted from statistical regression together with spatial analysis. The locality framework together with a combination of qualitative methods allowed me to present a case-study of the Xavante indigenous peoples’ territorialization strategies beyond the boundaries of their indigenous reserve. The use of hybrid methodology in different scales resulted in a comprehensive understanding on the territorial quest indigenous peoples have lived through.

Thursday, February 27, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Our Master’s Students will present their research in a poster session for this Colloquium.

Speaker: Maíra Irigaray Castro

PhD Student, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, February 13, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

The Munduruku Movement Ipereğ Ayũ (MMIA), which in Munduruku translates to “We are strong; We know how to protect ourselves and all We believe in,” is a new autonomous social movement at the forefront to resist the government’s destructive plans for Amazonia and ensure legal guarantees to self-determination and homelands. Also, of interest is the Wakoborûn Indigenous Women’s Association and Movement (WIWM), an organization within MMIA that was formed in 2017 to unite the Munduruku women in the struggle. MMIA and WIWM have been recognized for their efforts to educate and empower a broad segment of the Munduruku people, facilitate organizational cohesion among the tribal communities, and establish alliances with regional, transnational, and global organizations and movements. Despite growing international attention, very little has been written about them beyond the grey literature. The goal of my research is to fill this gap in the scholarship, providing a fuller account of MMIA and WIWM by employing a decolonizing framework that integrates Feminist and Indigenous Political Ecology with Geographies of Resistance to illuminate MMIA and WIWM’s genesis stories, and explore how their experiences through cycles of contention triggered by Amazonia development pressures define their grievances and shape their organizational structure and strategies for collective action.

Image courtesy Dr. Jason Blackburn.

Speaker: Dr. Jason Blackburn

Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, January 30, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

By default, geographers are travelers and our collaborations span the globe. This is especially true at the University of Florida, where geography faculty, research staff, students, and postdocs are engaged in research and teaching on nearly all continents. As part of this, we need tools to keep us connected. Cloud-based data sharing, communication, and partnership are advancing rapidly, and becoming truly seamless, across platforms and devices. At the same time, there is increasing access to stable and reasonable bandwidth internet to access these tools, including even some remote areas. While internet-based tools are not the only solution to collaboration, nor do they fully replace travel for in-person field/site/lab visits, tools such as Zoom, Microsoft Teams/One Drive, and a variety of social media and web-based telecom apps are bringing our partnerships together in real or near real time. This talk will illustrate how the Spatial Epidemiology & Ecology Research Lab is capitalizing on collaboration tools to maintain active research and training programs across the continents from monitoring saiga antelope movements in Kazakhstan to tracing human anthrax in Vietnam – and connecting a diverse and interdisciplinary team across GIS and microbiology labs on right here on campus.

Image courtesy Dr. Joann MossaImpacts, Recovery, and Ongoing Stressors in the Apalachicola River, Florida

Speaker: Dr. Joann Mossa

Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, January 23, 2019

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

The Apalachicola River has experienced impacts because of dredging for navigation and hydrologic droughts exacerbated by upstream water consumption. We review these impacts and discuss how the river is recovering following the end of dredging and the application of floodplain inundation models. Sand bars are stabilizing with vegetation since dredging ended, but ongoing impacts include erosion of dredge spoil mounds altering the adjacent channel and reduced water inputs affecting the floodplain and bay.

Image courtesy Dr. Sadie Ryan

Speaker: Dr. Sadie Ryan

Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Florida

Thursday, January 16, 2020

2:50-3:50 PM (Period 8)

Turlington Hall Room 3018

University of Florida

All are welcome to attend.

Forecasting the impacts of climate change on vector-borne diseases (VBDs)—especially those under current public scrutiny and concern, such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika—is a key component of global public health preparedness, and a key component of the ongoing issue of climate change preparedness. In this talk, I will showcase a strategy for applying ecophysiological models of temperature-dependent transmission to current and future climate models at large scales. I will demonstrate how our collaborative team have used these models to explore future scenarios for malaria, and for Aedes spp transmitted diseases, and how we can use mapping approaches as useful visualization tools, and how we tackle describing the multiple potential outcomes. I will also describe some local-scale, city and province level approaches to understanding vectorborne disease dynamics and management, and explore issues of how these two scales come together (or don’t) for decision making on the ground and in the boardroom.

Bio: Sadie J. Ryan is an Associate Professor of Medical Geography in the Department of Geography and in the Emerging Pathogens Institute (EPI) at the University of Florida, and PI of the Quantitative Disease Ecology and Conservation (QDEC) Lab group (www.sadieryan.net).

Ryan’s training is in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (BA, Princeton), with an emphasis on conservation biology, quantitative ecology, and particularly, disease ecology. Ryan’s PhD work (UC Berkeley) centered on African buffalo spatial ecology in their savanna environment, in the context of an epidemic of Bovine Tuberculosis. Ryan’s postdoctoral work in Anthropological Science (Stanford, McGill), Ecology (NCEAS) and Geography (UCSB), launched her interdisciplinary work looking at the anthropogenic impacts of land use change, climate change, and conservation management goals in African parks landscapes, and the role of socioecological systems in disease transmission in Africa and Latin America.

This research continues today, investigating the multiscale issues of climate-health relationships in and on landscapes, and interactions with livelihoods, sustainability, parks management goals, the urban environment, and local perceptions. QDEC Lab is home to multiple projects in ecology at the human interface, spanning socioecological systems of vector borne and environmental disease ecology, climate-health modeling, insecticide resistance, and wildlife conservation, from Florida to the Old and New World tropics.