MOSSA and WUDecadal-Scale Variations of Thalweg Morphology and Riffle–Pool Sequences in Response to Flow Regulation in the Lowermost Mississippi River

Chia-Yu Wu and Joann Mossa

Article first published online: 5 JUN 2019 Water

DOI: 10.3390/w11061175

ABSTRACT: The lowermost Mississippi River (LMR) is one of the largest deltaic systems in North America and one of the heavily human-manipulated fluvial river systems. Historic hydrographic surveys from the mid-1900s to the early 2010s were used to document the thalweg morphology adjustments, as well as the riffle–pool sequences. Extensive aggradation was observed during 1950s to 1960s, as the Atchafalaya River was enlarging before the completion of the Old River Control Structure (ORCS). Following the completion of the ORCS, reductions in sediment input to the LMR resulted in net degradation of the thalweg profile patterns since the mid-1960s except for the 1992–2004 period. Different flood events that supplied sediment might be the cause of upstream aggradation from 1963–1975 and net aggradation along the entire reach from 1992–2004. Furthermore, the change pattern of thalweg profiles appear to be controlled by backwater effects, as well as the Bonnet Carré spillway opening. Results from riffle–pool sequences reveal that the averaging Ws ratios (length to channel width) are 6–7, similar to numerous previous studies. Temporal variations of the same riffles and pools reveal that aggradation and degradation might be heavily controlled by similar factors to the thalweg variations (i.e., sediment supply, backwater effects). In sum, this study examines decadal-scale geomorphic responses in a low-lying large river system subject to different human interventions, as well as natural flood events. Future management strategies of this and similar river systems should consider recent riverbed changes in dredging, sediment management, and river engineering.

Read the full publication at Water

Geo3930 – Geo6938 Extreme Droughts & Water Wars Fall 2019

Examines water resources and the physical, social and economic consequences when the quantity or quality of water is limited and/or decreasing through case studies in different environments (rivers, lakes, groundwater, etc.) and different countries. Topics include: Historic droughts and megadroughts,

drying rivers, shrinking lakes, dust storms, desertification, wildfires, privatization, desalination, water scarcity, migration, water diversion and retention, water shortages, famines, water wars and cooperation

Successful students will be able to:

  • Describe the two-way relationship between water resources and human society
  • Synthesize scientific and social information about drought and it’s relation to other fields

Semester: Fall 2019

Time and Location: Tuesday Per. 3: 9:35-10:25, Thursday Per. 3-4: 9:35-11:30

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher.

Contact information: Dr. Joann Mossa, mossa@ufl.edu

Geo3341 Extreme Floods – Geo6348 Floods Seminar Fall 2019

Examines the world’s most extreme floods from the Pleistocene through present due to various causes.  Discusses physical and human aspects of flood warning, preparedness, response and recovery throughout the world. Topics include past and present physical and human-influenced drivers of floods, problems beyond direct inundation, varied outcomes of floods and lessons learned, flood management and the future

Semester: Fall 2019

Time and Location: Tuesday | Per. 6 – 7 (12:50 PM – 2:45 PM), Thursday | Period 6 (12:50 PM – 1:40 PM)

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher

Contact information: Dr. Joann Mossa, mossa@ufl.edu

Dr. Joann Mossa (center) being awarded the R.J. Russell Award with Dr. Jean Ellis (left) and Dr. Heidi Lannon (right)

UF Geography would like to share the exciting news of Dr. Joann Mossa being awarded the R.J. Russell Award from the Coastal and Marine Specialty group, of which Dr. Heidi Lannon serves as Chair. Dr. Jean Ellis from South Carolina and Dr. Heidi Lannon nominated Joann for this prestigious award.

Joann is only the 3rd woman to win this award and joins coastal geomorphology elite! See past winners here!

Congratulations Joann! Another amazing #GeoGators achievement!

The UF Geography Department is sending a large contingent to New Orleans for the 2018 meeting of the American Association of Geographers

Find out where you can see a GeoGator present their research below:

Anthropogenic change to fluvial systems, I
Geomorphology Specialty Group, Paleoenvironmental Change Specialty Group, Water Resources Specialty Group
4/10/2018
8:20 AM
Balcony K, Marriott, 4th Floor
Anthropogenic Disturbances and Sand Bar Size Variations of Coastal Plain Rivers, USA
Joann Mossa

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Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (I)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/10/2018
9:00 AM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
Using a Network Analysis Framework to Discuss Delivery of Mosquito Abatement Services in Machala, Ecuador
Catherine A Lippi, Liang Mao, Sadie J Ryan

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Anthropogenic change to fluvial systems, II
Geomorphology Specialty Group, Paleoenvironmental Change Specialty Group, Water Resources Specialty Group
4/10/2018
11:20 AM
Room: Balcony K, Marriott, 4th Floor
Riffle-Pool Variability in the Confined Lowermost Mississippi River
Chia-Yu Wu, Joann Mossa

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Applications of Time Series Remote Sensing at the Global to Landscape Scale
4/10/2018
12:40 PM
Grand Chenier, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Examining vegetation changes in Eastern Zambia savanna landscapes from 1984-2016: an integrated approach
Hannah Herrero, Jane Southworth

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Applications of Time Series Remote Sensing at the Global to Landscape Scale
4/10/2018
1:20 PM
Grand Chenier, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Latitudes and land use: global biome shifts in greenness persistence across three decades
Jane Southworth, Sadie J Ryan, Reza Khatami, Peter Waylen, Hannah V Herrero

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Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (III)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/10/2018
1:40 PM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
The future is uncertain: global shifts in potential distribution and seasonal risk of Aedes-transmitted viruses
Sadie Jane Ryan

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Experiential Learning in Geography Education II
Geography Education Specialty Group
4/10/2018
3:40 PM
Napoleon A1, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Recruitment and retention in Geosciences through integrated professional and academic experiences
Heidi J. L. Lannon, Corene Matyas

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Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (IV)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group
4/10/2018
4:00 PM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
Precise space-time interventions on intra-urban dengue outbreaks using large-scale mobile phone tracking data
Liang Mao

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Geographic research on vector-borne diseases (V)
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/10/2018
5:20 PM
Lafayette, Marriott, 41st Floor
A GIS-based Machine Learning Technique for Predicting Spatial Distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae), the Main Vectors of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis
Abolfazl Mollalo

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Land Change Science
Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Remote Sensing Specialty Group
4/11/2018
8:20 AM
Maurepas, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Operational large-area land-cover mapping: Ethiopia case study
Reza Khatami, Jane Southworth, Carly Muir

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Topics in U.S. Regional Geography
Rural Geography Specialty Group
4/11/2018
10:00 AM
Galvez, Marriott, 5th Floor
Changing Economic Geography of Southern New England’s “Tobacco Valley”: Surviving in the 21st Century
Matthew McKay

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High-Level Perspectives: NSF, Geosciences, Big Ideas, and Geography
4/11/2018
11:50 AM – 1:10 PM
Bayside C, Sheraton, 4th Floor
This session will feature comments from William Easterling, who currently serves as the Assistant Director for Geosciences at the National Science Foundation. On assignment from positions as a professor and dean at Pennsylvania State University, Easterling is the first geographer to serve in the second-highest level of officials at NSF. His comments will touch on issues related to NSF that geographers will find of interest, including federal support for basic research; major emphases for NSF, the NSF Big Ideas, and opportunities for geographers in the Directorate for Geosciences. Other geographers currently at NSF will serve as discussants and provide complementary perspectives from their divisions in the Biological Sciences and Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences directorates. Overall, this special session is designed to provide attendees with new perspectives regarding trends, opportunities, and issues at NSF.
Michael Binford

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Environmental Geography
4/11/2018
1:40 PM
Balcony N, Marriott, 4th Floor
Morphometric differences between megafans and alluvial fans
M. Anwar Sounny-Slitine

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Spatial Demography
Population Specialty Group
4/11/2018
6:40 PM
Studio 4, Marriott, 2nd Floor
Spatially explicit age segregation index and self-rated health of older adults in U.S. cities
Guangran Deng, Liang Mao

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Hurricanes I: Climatology/meteorology
4/12/2018
9:00 AM
Napoleon D1, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Spatial characteristics of rain fields associated with tropical cyclones landfalling over the western Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea
Yao Zhou, Corene Matyas

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Geographies of health and health care V: Spatial and temporal analysis
Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group
4/12/2018
1:20 PM
Estherwood, Sheraton, 4th Floor
Understanding temporal changes of access to healthcare: an analytic framework for local factor impacts
Jue Yang, Liang Mao

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Regional evolutionary economic geography approaches to destination evolution
Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Specialty Group
4/12/2018
1:20 PM – 3:00 PM
Mid-City, Sheraton, 8th Floor
A Comparative Assessment of Tourism Development of Zambian National Parks to those in the South African Region
Brian Child

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Physical Geography Poster Session II
4/12/2018
1:20 PM – 3:00 PM
Napoleon Foyer/Common St. Corridor, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Accessibility to hurricane shelters for Airbnb users in Miami metropolitan area
Sanghoon Kim

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Development, Geospatial Technologies and Spatial Organization in Africa
Africa Specialty Group
4/12/2018
4:00 PM
Gallier A, Sheraton, 4th Floor
Vegetation Persistence and Change in Ethiopia as a Function of Climate
Carly Muir, Jane Southworth, Reza Khatami

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Preparing Competitive Research Grants in Biogeography
Biogeography Specialty Group, Careers and Professional Development
4/12/2018
5:20 PM – 7:00 PM
Studio 1, Marriott, 2nd Floor
This panel, organized by and for biogeographers but open to all, aims to review and discuss the ins and outs of preparing competitive research grants. Discussion topics will range from where, how, and why to successfully seek external funding for biogeographic research, NSF broader impacts and intellectual merit, lesser-known sources of funding, what to do when the big plans fall through, and much more. The panel features panelists from various career stages and areas of expertise.
Michael Binford

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Geographies of Climate Change Mitigation: Marketization, Financialization, and Decarbonization 1
Economic Geography Specialty Group, Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
4/13/2018
8:40 AM
Grand Ballroom D, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Tropical Africa and the Political Economy of Climate Change Mitigation
Abe Goldman

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Landscape Speciality Group-Student Presentation Competition II
Landscape Specialty Group
4/13/2018
10:40 AM
Estherwood, Sheraton, 4th Floor
A landscape level analysis of urbanization, lake level change and community impacts in Mwanza Gulf, Tanzania
Ryan Good, Jane Southworth

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Wetlands and Meadows: Integrated Research in Geomorphology, Soils, Hydrology, Biogeography and Microclimatology
Biogeography Specialty Group, Climate Specialty Group, Geomorphology Specialty Group
4/13/2018
3:40 PM
Astor Ballroom I, Astor, 2nd Floor
Predicting the Potential Geographic Distributions of Non-Native Fishes in Florida with Climate Change
Joseph A. Andreoli

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Tropical Conservation, Development & Agriculture Short Papers
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group, Graduate Student Affinity Group
4/13/2018
5:53 PM
Rampart, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Climate, Food Insecurity and Under-five Stunting in Zambia
Audrey Smith

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Tropical Conservation, Development & Agriculture Short Papers
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group, Graduate Student Affinity Group
4/13/2018
5:53 PM
Rampart, Sheraton, 5th Floor
Situational Analysis of Mangalane, Mozambique in the context of a Community Based Natural Resource Management Project
Leandra Merz

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Health (Workforce) Geography
Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group
4/14/2018
8:00 AM
Oak Alley, Sheraton, 4th Floor
Mapping rural–urban disparities in late-stage cancer with space-time rurality index and GWR
Liang Mao, Jue Yang, Guangran Deng

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Analyzing movement data using GIS: Lagrangian and Eulerian perspectives
Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
4/14/2018
4:00 PM – 5:40 PM
Napoleon B2, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Living la Vida T-LoCoH: Site fidelity amongst Florida wild and captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during the epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) transmission period
Emily Dinh, Jeremy P. Orange, Jason K. Blackburn

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Analyzing space and time in the African environments
4/14/2018
5:20 PM
Grand Ballroom D, Astor, 2nd Floor
Time Series Analysis of Vegetation Change and Changes in Persistence Analyses in Umfolozi-Hluhluwe Park 2001-2016
Meshari Alenezi

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Health and Hazards
Type: Paper
4/13/2018
6:00 PM
Napoleon B2, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Effects of Brucellosis Serological Status on Physiological Conditions and Behavioral Mechanisms of Southwestern Montana Elk
Anni Yang, Jason Blackburn

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Health and Hazards
Type: Paper
4/13/2018
6:40 PM
Napoleon B2, Sheraton 3rd Floor
Inferring processes from dynamic abundance time series
Jason Blackburn

Floating Fish Camp, Apalachicola River, Florida. Image courtesy The Florida Geographer.

CHEN, MOSSAFloating fish camps on the Apalachicola River, Florida: Increases and Implications

Joann Mossa, Yin-Hsuen Chen

Article first published online: 09 FEB 2018 The Florida Geographer

ABSTRACT:

Peoples from various cultures and locations have been living on the edge or margin of water-land interfaces in floating houses of various types, either permanently or part-time. In some cases, people build these to access natural resources from both water and land environments. Through fieldwork on the Apalachicola River and branches, including the lower Chipola and Brothers Rivers in the Florida panhandle, a large variety of floating camps were observed. The purposes of this paper are to: 1) review historical information on the occurrence of floating dwellings and camps worldwide to give context to the study area; 2) map patterns and change since 1994 in different parts of the basin, including whether adjoining public or private lands to interpret potential areas of concern; and 3) examine the vernacular architecture of floating structures. Much of our discussion concerns current policy regarding floating structures in light of the need to maintain the ecological integrity of the river.

The earliest known references to floating homes or camps in the study area date back to the Great Depression of the 1930s, when society was in need of low-cost housing. Rather than being clustered in communities, the fish camps of the Apalachicola River and branches are spaced across this system. The number of floating camps along the Apalachicola River and some of its major branches, as measured using Google Earth and historical aerial photography, has increased from 63 in 1994 to 132 in 2004 to 177 in 2015. Since dredging associated with the Navigation Project stopped in 2002, 78% of the growth or 34 of 45 new floating structures has been on the main-stem Apalachicola River, compared to 54% or 37 of 69 from 1994 to 2004. Nearly half of the fish camps are located next to public lands, which in some cases are impacted by people residing within the camps. The rustic structures typically are built of reused building materials; amenities can include air conditioning and satellite dish television, and decorations include flags or name plaques. Studies of floating dwellings elsewhere, and communication with local officials, provides some guidance on the benefits and concerns for these increasingly numerous dwellings in terms of public safety, crime, and environment in relation to existing and potential policy.

Read the full publication at The Florida Geographer

 

 

 

 

irma0001, Air Force Magazine. Hurricane Irma passes Cuba and approaches southern Florida on Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, in a NASA satellite captured a night-time image of the storm in the Florida Straits and identified where the strongest storms were occurring within Irma’s structure. NOAA’s GOES-East satellite provided a visible image at the time of Irma’s landfall in the Florida Keys. NASA photo

Geography’s Dr. Corene Matyas and Dr. Joann Mossa recently spoke to several new outlets about the cause and result of Hurricane Irma.

9/7 Dr. Corene Matyas explains the mechanics of a Catergory 5 storm at HowStuffWorks.com

9/7 Dr. Corene Matyas talks to Canada’s CTV News channel about what #Florida can expect from Hurricane Irma

9/7 Dr. Matyas talks to BBC 5 Live (1h18m) about the impact of Hurricane Irma

9/7 Dr. Corene Matyas talks to David McCullagh about the projected #hurricane path of Hurricane Irma

9/8 Dr. Corene Matyas tells the BBC what might happen during Hurricane Irma

9/19 Dr. Joann Mossa explains why Florida flooded during Hurricane Irma on INTERSECTION: WHY FLORIDA FLOODS 

 

 

 

 

 

CHEN, MOSSA, WUAnthropogenic landforms and sediments from dredging and disposing sand along the Apalachicola River and its floodplain

Joann Mossa, Yin-Hsuen Chen, Scott P. Walls, G. Mathias Kondolf, Chia-Yu Wu

Article first published online: 12 MAR 2017 Geomorphology

DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2017.03.010

ABSTRACT: The Apalachicola River, which begins at the confluence of the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers near the Georgia-Florida State line, has multiple human impacts. Water inputs declined due to upstream irrigation and urbanization in Georgia. Sediment trapped by numerous small to large dams, including construction of Jim Woodruff Dam in 1954 near the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) confluence has increased degradation. Shortly thereafter, the river was modified for a navigation project, with 29.6 × 106 m3 dredged between 1957 and 2002 from the Apalachicola alone. This study investigates how historic dredging coincides with the modern morphology of the channel and how historic dredging, disposal, and other activities have modified the floodplain landforms and sediments. This analysis of the navigation impacts in the middle Apalachicola River (River Miles 40 to 65) ties spatial and temporal variations of dredging, field-derived bathymetry, historic maps, patterns of floodplain disposal of dredge spoil from LiDAR imagery, and modern point bar channel change of the Apalachicola River. Floodplain mounds of coarse material, built from out-of-bank disposal constitute > 800,000 m3 in the study area. Approximately 7.7 × 106 m3 of sediment was dredged within the study reach, roughly 11% of the volume dredged remains on the floodplain. Sand bars were disposal sites thus their increased area of 263% is partly tied to this practice. Thus, the legacy of dredging affects the modern sedimentology and morphology of the floodplain and channel. Findings show that a failed navigation project could have been pre-empted with better geomorphic, geologic and hydrologic study and suggest that vegetative restoration of point bars would help in narrowing and stabilizing this dynamic system.

Read the full publication at Geomorphology

 

 

 

 

 

geo4281-geo6282-river-forms-processes

Discusses hydrology, landforms, hazards, and human impacts in rivers.

Major topics: drainage basins, channel hydrology, sediments and sedimentary deposits, channel form, and channel changes.

Relevance: related to environmental management, earth sciences, geoarchaeology, aquatic ecology, river basin and floodplain management, river restoration, and urban and regional planning.

Approach: mixes lectures, project-based learning (data analysis using spreadsheets, Google Earth), group projects, and nearby field trips.