Doctoral students, Carly Muir and Ryan Good, have been selected to participate in the NASA DEVELOP Program during summer 2019 through Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Part of NASA’s Applied Sciences Program, DEVELOP addresses environmental and public policy issues through interdisciplinary research projects that apply the lens of NASA Earth observations to community concerns around the globe. Bridging the gap between NASA Earth Science and society, DEVELOP builds capacity in both participants and partner organizations to better prepare them to address the challenges that face our society and future generations.

Ryan and Carly are both working at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, this summer. Ryan’s project focuses on evaluating drought indices to enhance early warning systems in Kenya, and Carly’s project is analyzing flood risk in coastal communities of Central America after natural disasters, such as tropical storms, tidal flooding, and tsunamis.

To learn more about NASA DEVELOP, visit https://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

PhD Candidate Ryan Good was recently awarded a prestigious Fulbright Fellowship to Kenya for the 2019-2020 academic year.

The Fulbright Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences. The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding.

Stephanie Mundis teaching Oak Hall students about Kenya. Photo credit Abbey Farmer.

UF Geography PhD student Stephanie Mundis (QDEC Lab, Emerging Pathogens Institute) recently visited the second graders at Oak Hall School, where she gave a presentation on her past work in Kenya. The second graders of Oak Hall have been studying Kenya this semester in preparation for their singing performance at Oak Hall’s International Day. When Stephanie taught them some phrases in Swahili, they surprised her by breaking into song. We’re glad that Stephanie was able to share her experiences in Kenya with the children and we look forward to future outreach opportunities at Oak Hall.

Stephanie Mundis teaching Oak Hall students about Kenya. Photo credit Mike Ryan Simonovich.
Stephanie Mundis teaching Oak Hall students about Kenya. Photo credit Courtney Weber.