CAPPSPredicting monthly streamflows and their variability from limited historic records in the Tárcoles watershed, Costa Rica

Holli Nicole Capps

Article first published online: 01 NOV 2018 Journal of Undergraduate Research

DOI: 10.32473/uf%20jur.v20i1.106980

ABSTRACT: Lack of instrumentation in many developing nations makes it difficult to gauge available water resources, an essential part of national socioeconomic wellbeing. Costa Rica is a developing country that has considerable hydrologic data. This study establishes a simple model from limited data to predicted mean monthly flows and their interannual variability at unmonitored locations, within the densely populated Tárcoles watershed of Costa Rica. Relationships between basin area and percentiles of historic flows are derived as a matrix of monthly flow percentiles and averages that can be transformed into potential flows. The station used to validate the model has limited records and contains apparently abnormal flows, nonetheless results indicate considerable success of the model. It could further be refined and tested with more discharge stations. In turn, the modelling approach could be used to predict monthly flows and their variability within the Tárcoles basin as well as other countries where information may be lacking.

Read the full publication at the Journal of Undergraduate Research

 

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of Mr. Andre McFadden II
Image courtesy of Mr. Andre McFadden II

Recent Geography graduate Mr. Andre McFadden II just received the Best Paper award in the Physical Science Category from UF’s Journal of Undergraduate Research for his paper El Niño – Southern Oscillation and it’s Effect on Rainfall Patterns in the Lake Mweru Basin, Zambia. Andre graduated with a B.A. in Geography with a Certificate in Meteorology and Climatology in December 2015. He wrote the paper as part of a research project with his adviser Dr. Peter Waylen, who recommended that Andre submit it to the Journal of Undergraduate Research.

“I would like to thank the instructors and TAs that I have worked with in the Department of Geography and my research adviser Dr. Waylen for giving me the opportunity to do research and write a paper,” said Andre. “I also would like to thank a former undergraduate student Marlee Henninge who introduced me to Dr. Waylen and Undergraduate Research.”

Andre intends to attend the SouthEastern Division of the Association of American Geographers (SEDAAG) conference in November, and is preparing to apply for graduate school.

“This experience has opened my eyes to new opportunities in research and I am going to take full advantage of it,” says Andre.

MUIR – Analysis of Rainfall Variability in Relation to Crop Production in Maun, Botswana

Carly Muir

Article first published online: 01 JAN 2016 University of Florida Journal of Undergraduate Research

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyze patterns of the average rainfall characteristics during the growing season in Maun before and after a climatic shift that took place in the 1970’s and to assess how this variability affects risks of crop production at specified planting dates. Plots show that the majority of the water year experienced a decrease in the mean of both rainfall total and the count of rainy days. The graph developed can show probabilities of risk within a specified range and could help farmers make decisions about which types of crops to grow and when to plant as they adapt to the new conditions.

Read the full publication at University of Florida Journal of Undergraduate Research

MUIR – Analysis of Rainfall Variability in Relation to Crop Production in Maun, Botswana

Carly Muir

Article first published online: Spring 2015, Journal of Undergraduate Research

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyze patterns of the average rainfall characteristics during the growing season in Maun before and after a climatic shift that took place in the 1970’s and to assess how this variability affects risks of crop production at specified planting dates. Plots show that the majority of the water year experienced a decrease in the mean of both rainfall total and the count of rainy days. The graph developed can show probabilities of risk within a specified range and could help farmers make decisions about which types of crops to grow and when to plant as they adapt to the new conditions.

Read the full publication at Journal of Undergraduate Research